About the visual identity

The look and feel of Simhanada’s identity is based on its teaching philosophy — well-grounded, simple but not simplistic, bold, respectful of lineage and heritage, attentive to detail, undirected by current trends. The brand mark uses the typeface “Metric”, thoughtfully designed by Klim Foundry based on engineered geometry found in classic German wayfinding systems. The tittle on the “i” incorporates a half-circle; not only does it reference the shape of the new building’s staircase, it also alludes to the practice as an on-going, life long endeavour that will never be fully completed.

Beautifully photographed by Brent Lukey, the images used throughout all the collaterals feature textures and materials from both the original heritage-listed site and the newly constructed building.

History of the building

The original building was built in 1856 as “Portsea House” and served as a hotel. The back area contained stables, where horses were changed between the GPO and Heidelberg. By 1886, the building was used as a bakery and a grocer’s shop. The bakery was used as a meeting place for a religious sect while the shop continued as a corner store run by Chinese immigrants who then left during the second World War. From the late 1940’s,  stained glass artist Alan Sumner MBE took possession of the unoccupied building and converted part of the old bakery into his studio.

26 December 1982; Photo from the State Library of Victoria
26 December 1982; Photo from the State Library of Victoria
30 March 2009; Photo by Aimee Hall
30 March 2009; Photo by Aimee Hall

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

About the new building

Designed by Richard Stampton Architects, the architectural design behind the yoga studio integrates the principles of imperfect repetition, asceticism and humanism. Through respectful preservation of the exterior, a subtle northern extension and the purposeful conversion of the interior, an old building has been transformed and reused. Recent dilapidation and a dark ground floor have given way to a dynamic series of spaces (including one practice space on the top floor and another at ground level), light diffusing forms and raw materials for the daily practices of the Simhanada community.

Fine grid geometries of the ceiling and lucid glass walls are counterposed by an atrium garden of blasted granite boulders. A raw steel staircase curves over the boulders, providing a gradual and tempered transition from the ground floor to the generous practice space above. The glazed atrium embraces the changing light throughout the day and seasons.

Click here to view images of the space.